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Get ready America for sugar sticker shock.

spoon sugar1You will be blown away when you grocery shop this summer. You’ll discover pounds, just pounds of hidden sugar in the food and beverages you and your family consumes.

The Food and Drug Administration Friday rolled out new rules for nutrition labels on packaged foods and drinks. The rules will highlight the amount of “added sugar” and calories in a given product. The measures are part of a new effort to combat obesity and diabetes.

Added sugars. Oh it can’t be that bad. Oh yes it can.

Peanut butter. Jar spaghetti sauce. All those healthy breakfast cereals and sports drinks. It adds up. Right now, the average American eats about 115 grams (23 teaspoons) of added sugar a day. Under the new FDA rules, the new daily value for added sugar will be 50 grams – less than half that amount.

I’m not anti-sugar. I love my cookies, cakes and ice cream. Every once in a while, it’s time to make the doughnuts. But that’s where sugar belongs. I know I’m being bad.

And I have a word to say about yogurt. Guh?

That expensive, health-touting yogurt must be good for us. Certainly better than a scrambled egg. yogurt 1Turn the carton around and read the nutrition label.You’ll  need to know what to look for because, the label is, should we say, less than complete.

That little cup of yogurt can contain anywhere from  7 to 30 grams of sugar (One teaspoon of sugar equals 4 grams). 30 grams=nearly 8 teaspoons of sugar-in a single cup of healthy yogurt . Even the so-called light yogurt contain around 7 grams of sugar (2 tsp).

Yogurt doesn’t sound so healthy now, does it ?

You see people walking out the mini-marts with A 20-ounce pop. That’s 16 teaspoons of sugar. Think about that. Five tablespoons. That’s just one drink. How many people do you know who chug down more than one can of soda a day.

Is it a wonder diabetes and heart disease is growing?

sugary foods

Don’t even get me started on breakfast cereals.

The good news is that the food industry apparently knows the party’s over. Manufacturers have already started to curb it on the sugar.

The new labels will tell you how much added sugar there is.

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(WebMD.com graphic)

Serving sizes will be more realistic. more aligned to what we actually eat or drink. In other words, the whole 12-ounce can will be counted, not just eight ounces (I bet you didn’t know that).

Calories will be in bold. And bigger.

Daily values will be updated to reflect the most recent science. for example, the daily value for fiber has been increased from 25 grams to 28 grams.

New vitamins and minerals get some attention. Potassium and vitamin D, two nutrients Americans tend to fall short getting.

The PBS News Hour laid it out. Also check out lower sugar and calorie peppermint brownies recipe on WebMD.com

 

Published inCerebrationsNews

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